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Sian Francis Cox
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A24 announces mysterious new project, A24 Public Access

Another streaming service, or a roster of films headed for the public domain? Earlier this week indie entertainment company A24 tweeted a cryptic new project called ‘#A24PublicAccess’, which has opened up a mine of potential...

 
 
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Flix for Short: Anima

Anima is an experimental short film directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, signalling the release of the eponymous album by Radiohead’s frontman Thom Yorke. The pair had previously worked together on the video for Daydreaming, and since th...

 
 
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Richard Curtis teases Blackadder reunion special

The possibility of a Blackadder revival has been on the table for a while, but this week Richard Curtis has revived speculation by mentioning a ‘gorgeous’ reunion between frontmen Rowan Atkinson and Tony Robinson. We should al...

 
 
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Millie Bobby Brown, Henry Cavill to star in Enola Holmes

If we think about all the Sherlock Holmes adaptations that have come to the big screen over the last decade or so, we’re spoilt for choice. Now, with the announcement of an adaptation of Enola Holmes, I’m looking forward to seei...

 
 
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Review: Ophelia

Shakespeare can be a very polarising subject, as we've been debating at length here among the Flixist staff. But if the long-winded passages just aren't for you, and you don't share the Brits' appreciation for the Bard, then I have g...

 
 
 
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Bo Burnham: comedy in the age of anxiety

There is something undeniably addictive about Bo Burnham’s work, and watching Eighth Grade only deepened my appreciation for him. He intrigues and saddens me in equal measure because he’s prodigiously gifted. How can one person,...

 
 
 
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Review: Free Trip To Egypt

Canadian-born Muslim Tarek Mounib had lived most of his life with a cultural double-identity. One day, he suddenly had the idea to offer any willing participants in the US a free trip to Egypt and to film the experience, aiming to help ...

 
 
 
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Smithereens is already my favorite Black Mirror episode

A few days ago the news dropped that season 5 of Black Mirror was ready to roll, and today Netflix released a handful of trailers detailing what we can expect in the new season. Landing on 5 June, the three new previews may few in number ...

 
 
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Review: All is True

The year is 1613. The Globe Theatre, the embodiment of Shakespeare’s life work, has just burned to the ground, and the heartbroken writer has abandoned his work altogether, returning to his hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon. Just prio...

 
 
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Endgame: exploring the MCU’s post-9/11 trauma

Avengers: Endgame has fast become a part of history. With its monumental $1.3 billion opening weekend, the film was nothing short of a cultural event, solidifying the MCU in modern history. Yet in the hype it’s easy to fo...

 
 
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Review: Knock Down The House

Many people switch off when it comes to politics -- and rightly so. Politicians are typically disassociated with the working classes, and for many it’s either a case of fierce loyalty to the upheld order of things or disillusionment a...

 
 
 
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Review: Girls of the Sun

French director Eva Husson isn’t one to shy away from danger. Her previous film, Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) pretty much says all you need to know about her head-on filmmaking style. While watching Girls of the Sun, the story of a...

 
 
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Review: Trip of Compassion

I feel incredibly fortunate to have been able to attend a select theatrical screening of the Israeli film Trip of Compassion, both from a psychological point of view and as a critic attempting to make objective sense of the deep humanitaria...

 
 
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A first-timer's guide to Agnes Varda: Faces Places

French cinema is an area of filmmaking I’m really enthused by, and since learning about it as a student, the sheer novelty of the New Wave has always remained an area of fascination. Like many before me, I have a lot of respect fo...

 
 
 
 
 
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SXSW Review: Show Me The Picture: The Jim Marshall Story

For whatever reason, this SXSW was my year of documentaries. Maybe it’s because I like the journalistic element of them, and maybe it’s because they’ve put on show histories, cultures and politics in a way that I’d n...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Strange Negotiations

Strange Negotiations was a deeply personal and heartfelt documentary, an essay film exploring one man’s crisis of faith. Named after the eponymous album released by Christian/pop crossover band Pedro and the Lion in 2011, it centres o...

 
 
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Our top 10 movies of SXSW 2019

It’s been a fantastic year for movies at SXSW. We’ve laughed, we’ve cried, we’ve eaten more queso than I care to see again in my lifetime, and, attending for the first time, I can’t adequately express how muc...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Olympic Dreams

Maybe it’s in the name, but this is a dream of a film. To see a film completely sold out at the end of a festival is rare, but owing to its unique, funny, tenderness, Olympic Dreams was something truly special. Filmed on location at t...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Bluebird

To anyone who’s a fan of country music, the Bluebird Cafe, Nashville, is the holy grail, a place of pilgrimage and wonder. People come from far and wide across the United States and beyond to visit this unassuming little hole in the...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Pig Hag

Pig Hag is one of the best, most truthful films I’ve seen this festival. I don't say that flippantly -- there have been astounding documentaries tackling weighty issues -- but this narrative serves to uncover another form of injus...

 
 
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SXSW Review: La Mala Noche

La Mala Noche is an under-the-radar narrative premiering at SXSW this year, and with its heavy subject matter it’s easy to see why it would appeal to a niche audience. It follows the story of a beautiful woman named Dana (Noëll...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Days of the Whale

Set in Medellin, Colombia, Days of the Whale is a story of youthful rebellion and the inevitable consequences of getting in with the wrong crowd against your parents’ advice. Following young graffiti artists Cristina (Laura Tob&oacu...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The River and the Wall

I’ve spoken highly of all the films I’ve been fortunate enough to see over the course of the last five days at SXSW, and The River and the Wall was definitely among them. It has -- repeat, has -- to be seen on the big scre...

 
 
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SXSW Review: For Sama

For Sama is the story of the Syrian uprising and civil war, told through the point of view of Waad al Kateab. Her motivation for making the film is her daughter, Sama — a beautiful wide-eyed girl who has been born at such a tumultuo...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Aleksi

Aleksi made me laugh out loud so many times that I lose count. The directorial debut of Croatian director Barbara Vekaric and was a heartfelt, hilarious story of the dilemma 28-year-old Aleksi (Tihana Lazovic) experiences when she returns t...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Vai

Vai is a portmanteau film telling the stories of eight different women named Vai. Residing in seven different Pacific countries, their name means 'water', and they all have an innate connection to the sea, which accounts for their free sp...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Vision Portraits

Vision Portraits is the rare kind of film that you’ve always hoped to see, heralding back to the earliest use of montage in cinema in the 1920s and evoking a fresh sense of experimental, artistic filmmaking. Director Rodney Evans tr...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Go Back To China

Go Back To China will no doubt received mixed reviews from audiences of different backgrounds, but I’m of the opinion that it was a fantastic film. Part teen movie, semi-autobiographical, it toed the line between demonstrating really ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Community First, a Home for the Homeless

Community First is a true passion project of director Layton Blaylock. Seeing him involved in the residents’ lives is a powerful thing and reminds me of why we choose to make films: to explore the humanity in the ordinary, and to ex...

 
 
 


About Sian Francis Coxone of us since 2:37 PM on 04.26.2018

Based in the UK, Sian is an editor and regular contributor to Flixist, with bylines at Destructoid, and has worked as managing editor for Film Enthusiast. Her specialism is in early European arthouse cinema, and her tastes vary from silent comedies to Rodgers & Hammerstein musicals and Marvel.
 
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