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#Reviews


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SXSW Review: Adopt a Highway

In Adopt a Highway, Ethan Hawke plays recently released convict trying to find his way in a world that’s changed drastically since his incarceration over twenty years earlier. An ounce of weed and California’s third strike ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: La Mala Noche

La Mala Noche is an under-the-radar narrative premiering at SXSW this year, and with its heavy subject matter it’s easy to see why it would appeal to a niche audience. It follows the story of a beautiful woman named Dana (Noëll...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Frances Ferguson

Frances Ferguson is bored. She’s a 25-year-old substitute teacher with a dead marriage and a mother who is just as annoyed with her daughter as her daughter is with her. One day at school, she meets a student and, as dry and awkward f...

 
 
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Review: Who Let the Dogs Out

Who Let the Dogs Out is an hour-long documentary, and yet it feels just as powerful as any longer counterpart. Well, powerful isn't the right word. There's nothing powerful about one man's obsessive dive into the history of one-hit-won...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Them That Follow

I’m struck by just how at home Walton Goggins seems as some redneck pulled from a holler deep in Kentucky or elsewhere in the Appalachians. First made apparent in his epic run as Boyd Crowder on FX’s Justified, Goggins retu...

 
 
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SXSW Review: South Mountain

Confession time: South Mountain is not a movie I would ever normally see. It's a slow-burning, single location, family drama with about as much buzz as a dead bee. The only reason I saw it at SXSW was because it was screening early eno...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Days of the Whale

Set in Medellin, Colombia, Days of the Whale is a story of youthful rebellion and the inevitable consequences of getting in with the wrong crowd against your parents’ advice. Following young graffiti artists Cristina (Laura Tob&oacu...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The River and the Wall

I’ve spoken highly of all the films I’ve been fortunate enough to see over the course of the last five days at SXSW, and The River and the Wall was definitely among them. It has -- repeat, has -- to be seen on the big scre...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Red 11

In 1992, an aspiring filmmaker spent a month as a lab rat in exchange for a $7,000 paycheck. He flipped that check into El Mariachi and from there Robert Rodriguez’s career took off. Now, 25 years since the film’s rele...

 
 
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SXSW Review: For Sama

For Sama is the story of the Syrian uprising and civil war, told through the point of view of Waad al Kateab. Her motivation for making the film is her daughter, Sama — a beautiful wide-eyed girl who has been born at such a tumultuo...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Aleksi

Aleksi made me laugh out loud so many times that I lose count. The directorial debut of Croatian director Barbara Vekaric and was a heartfelt, hilarious story of the dilemma 28-year-old Aleksi (Tihana Lazovic) experiences when she returns t...

 
 
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Review: Woodsrider

Woodsrider, a documentary from Uncork’d Entertainment bills itself as a “season of adventure and self-discovery.” This is true, in so far as I, through the self-discovery of watching have learned to another degree, more or...

 
 
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SXSW Review: I Love You, Now Die

“If I talk about it, it gets better” That’s what Conrad Roy III said about his social anxiety. Speaking to his computer in a self-prescribed therapy session, Roy laid his feelings bare. At the age of 18, he had deep suicid...

 
 
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Review: Starfish

If one thing's going to strike you straight off the bat with Starfish, it's going to be that this movie is perhaps too hip for its own good. You got cassettes, rotary phones, plaid shirts, old movie theater tickets, tea, Victorian-era furni...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Porno

I love a good horror/comedy mashup like Porno, which debuted at SXSW this year, and when you splatter the screen with gore I'll probably love it even more. Take my glowing review of Snatchers, which also debuted at SXSW, as proof if you nee...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Booksmart

There’s something to be said for working hard to achieve goals. It’s what makes successful people successful, according to the barrage of "How To" articles that circulate on a regular basis. Tunnel vision and depriving oneself o...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The Highwaymen

We've all seen Bonnie and Clyde. We've all seen it, right? Jesus, people. Watch the classics. Fine, go watch Bonnie and Clyde then we can continue on. Now that we're all where we should be, remember the bumbling Texas police officer th...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Vai

Vai is a portmanteau film telling the stories of eight different women named Vai. Residing in seven different Pacific countries, their name means 'water', and they all have an innate connection to the sea, which accounts for their free sp...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Vision Portraits

Vision Portraits is the rare kind of film that you’ve always hoped to see, heralding back to the earliest use of montage in cinema in the 1920s and evoking a fresh sense of experimental, artistic filmmaking. Director Rodney Evans tr...

 
 
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Review: Made in Abyss: Journey's Dawn

I'm going to level with you all; Made in Abyss is one of my favorite anime series. After I first saw it in the summer of 2017, I knew that I was in love with it. Despite being thrown into Amazon's short-lived and poorly executed anime block...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The Art of Self-Defense

The Art of  Self-Defense is the kind of film that continually evolves from the moment you start watching it. Actually, it probably starts changing even before that. Its plot description belies its actuality and even if you've seen dire...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Yes, God, Yes

Sitting in her parent’s basement, 15-year-old Alice (Natalia Dyer) is about to get more than she bargained for playing movie title word scramble in an AOL chat room. Kids, AOL stands for America Online and, as their name sug...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Come As You Are

The road trip movie has a long and mostly terrible history. The genre has been done so much and has such specific requirements (you need a road, you need a trip, you need a car, you need an end goal) that it's become pretty redundant. You a...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Long Shot

Things started on a high note at the SXSW 2019 premiere of the Charlize Theron and Seth Rogen headliner comedy Long Shot. Upon entry to the Paramount theater, staff distributed free drink vouchers. It was either a semi-transparent ploy...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The Hottest August

I was in the wrong damn theater. Despite having checked with the SXSW volunteer at the door I was in the wrong theater. The realization hit me the moment they started introducing the film. Dramatic and powerful didn't sound like words you'd...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Go Back To China

Go Back To China will no doubt received mixed reviews from audiences of different backgrounds, but I’m of the opinion that it was a fantastic film. Part teen movie, semi-autobiographical, it toed the line between demonstrating really ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Community First, a Home for the Homeless

Community First is a true passion project of director Layton Blaylock. Seeing him involved in the residents’ lives is a powerful thing and reminds me of why we choose to make films: to explore the humanity in the ordinary, and to ex...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Salvage

Filmed over the course of nine years in Yellow Knife, Canada, Salvage is a straight forward presentation of a difficult documentary, which is something, considering its runtime is under an hour. Director Amy Elliott was motivated ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Body at Brighton Rock

Body at Brighton Rock is a unique horror film in that nearly nothing actually horrific happens in it. And yet, the film can be terrifying to an extreme. A movie that plays more on fear than it does on actual scares is a rare bird, but ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Snatchers

I've seen one horror movie already this SXSW that used the genre to discuss deeper issues, but Us and Snatchers take very different directions in how they do this. That's pretty evident from the trailer below but it was an interes...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Boyz In The Wood

After my screening, I left the theater smiling madly like a pretty girl I’d been crushing on in high school just texted me when I’d never given her my number. You know, broadly, too much teeth, nearly careening into things, like...

 
 
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Review: Between Worlds

Sometimes a truly weird Nicolas Cage film can slide between the cracks, slip beneath the floorboards, never to be discovered. This is a pitiful shame that needs to be avoided at all costs. Between Worlds recently released on DVD and has bee...

 
 
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Review: An Elephant Sitting Still

Writer/director Hu Bo took his own life shortly after completing An Elephant Sitting, adapted from one of his own stories. He was only 29 years old. His lone feature film is so deeply moving and despondent. It is beautiful, and yet it aches...

 
 
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Review: The Umbrella Academy

Imagine this: one day, you’re a person who’s totally not pregnant, not even a drop, minding your own biz-ness, enjoying some beach weather, and then, wham-o, the next and you’re full-term about to burst, like Jesus or...

 
 
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Review: Captain Marvel

Think about this: two of the last three Marvel movies weren't just great action films, but landmark events in modern cinema. Black Panther was a Best Picture nominee that set off a cultural celebration and addressed social issues that ...

 
 
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Review: The House

Watching The House reminded me of college, of the days when filmmakers were producing slick but low budget horror shorts for YouTube in the hopes that these efforts would open the door to recognition and funding to make feature films. Every...

 
 
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Review: Furie

You’ve probably seen Veronica Ngo (Ngô Thanh Vân) on the big screen before but didn’t realize it. Her biggest role was in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. She played Rose’s sister, who dies in the bombing run that ope...

 
 
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Review: Greta

Greta is in the tradition of those wonderfully bad thrillers that made B-movies in the 80s so fun to watch. A simple film with a creepy-ass antagonist and a young, beautiful protagonist. There's something welcoming to a premise so basi...

 
 
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Review: Climax

An introductory scene of Gaspar Noé’s Climax gives viewers some hints of what to expect. Interviews with the film’s character play on a CRT TV, where they speak of the artistic power of dance and what it means to their li...

 
 
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Review: The Cannibal Club

The Cannibal Club has a strong opening that blends convention and originality with something of a sinister smirk. Otavio (Tavinho Teixeira) and Gilda (Ana Luiza Rios) are a wealthy married couple in Brazil. Otavio owns a security firm and l...

 
 




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Reviews   filter by...

Under the Silver Lake"Beware the Dog Killer"

 

Hanna"Unique just means alone"

 

Mary Magdalene"The Passion 0.5"

 

Missing Link"No no, I think I found it all"

 

Hellboy"Oh boy..."

 

Ploey"A parent-child team review!"

 

Master Z: Ip Man Legacy"AKA: How to waste Michelle Yeoh"

 

Girls of the Sun"Women taking freedom into their own hands"

 

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote"The impossible dream meets the imperfect reality"

 

Rottentail"10,000 square feet of holiness"

 

The Haunting of Sharon Tate"Haunting for all the wrong reasons"

 

The Wind"A prairie home cacodemon"

 

Pet Sematary"Sometimes remade is better"

 

Peterloo"The sound of silence"

 

Shazam!"Say my name"

 

Trip of Compassion"Everything you know about PTSD, rewritten"

 

Dogman"Kindness can only get you so far"

 

Screwball"A swing for the fences results in a groundout "

 

Ramen Shop"Passes inspection"

 

The Beach Bum""Ain't that far down if we don't look, right?""

 

Dumbo"Guess how I'm feeling? Dumbo."

 

The Hummingbird Project"Nothing more exciting than laying cable"

 

Arrested Development - Season Five Part Two"They've Made a Huge Mistake"

 

Us"Turns out, the real monsters were us all along"

 
 
 
 
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